4 Indian universities in world’s top 200 most prestigious


Four Indian universities have made it to the list, including Indian Institute of Science (91-100 band), Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (126-150), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (176-200) and Indian Institute of Technology Madras (176-200).


Times Higher Education (THE) has announced the results of its annual Reputation Ranking, an academic-only invitational survey, listing the world’s top 200 most prestigious universities. This year, 10,963 published academics around the world cast 1,50,000 votes to give a clearer picture of universities they believe have the best reputation for research and teaching.

The top ten universities are Harvard University, United States of America – USA (1), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA (2), University of Oxford, United Kingdom – UK (3), Stanford University, USA (4), University of Cambridge, UK (5), University of California, Berkeley, USA (6), Princeton University, USA (7), Yale University, USA (8), University of California, Los Angeles, USA (9), and Tsinghua University, Mainland China, (10).


Mainland China has a record 17 representatives in the table. The ranking also sees success for the Netherlands, with nine universities a part of the ranking. Brazil is South America’s only representative in the table, with two ranked universities.


Phil Baty, chief knowledge officer, THE, said, “Reputation is a powerful currency for universities that plays a vital role in attracting student talent, academic talent, new partnerships and even inward investment. Mainland China’s breakthrough into the top 10 and its results across the table show that its excellence in higher education is increasingly coming to the notice of the wider world.”


Carried out every year, the Times Higher Education Reputation Survey is regarded as the biggest academic-only invitational survey of its kind. Results are weighted using UNESCO data to reflect the global distribution of scholars to ensure consistency across response rates. The survey is invitation only, with participants randomly selected from Elsevier’s Scopus database. It is available in fourteen languages and researchers must be actively publishing to participate.